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Finding Your Rhythm Profiling Practice 3: Setting Your Internal Thermometer

Weekly Practice 23

Every week we profile one of the “Reflect to Create! “ practices from my book, they are chosen at random from a jar on my desk.  My invitation is for you to try it out if it speaks to you in some way.

This week we are profiling Practice 3: Setting Your Internal Thermometer (from page 53 of my book). 

Practice 3 is part of The Prelude to the “Reflect to Create!” dance. The Prelude invites us “to pause or stop when we do not know a specific answer or when we need to think more creatively about a question, an issue or a dilemma”.  This has felt very real as our wi-fi at home has been out of commission this week and I have had to find new ways of managing my frustration and my in-tray!


I find Practice 3 really helpful as a way of checking in with myself – and for remembering that in every moment we can choose our action and reaction.  As Viktor Frankl reminds us:

Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.

Your thermometer is a great way of checking in with yourself to scan your energy (and your tiredness or patience) levels – where you can choose to create a space to more consciously choose your reaction!

For this Practice 

  • Start by visualising your own thermometer or temperature gauge.
  • Decide on the optimum temperature for you where you are working in flow or at your best.
  • At intervals during the day scan your heart, mind, body and soul to see if you need to pause due to overheating, the start of feeling a little out of control, a confusion or tiredness.

I use this practice regularly.  I made a commitment to myself a very long time ago that I will pause and / or not make any important decisions if I notice that my energy levels have dropped to below 80% at any point during the day. What is your cut off point?

Have a go! 

Start with small steps.

Reflect on what you are noticing.

Please do share your stories so we can all learn together.

Join us on our “Reflect to Create!”Facebook page.

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